A child is the greatest blessing

Overview

A miscarriage (also called a spontaneous abortion) is the unexpected ending of a pregnancy in the first 20 weeks of gestation. Just because it’s called a “miscarriage” doesn’t mean you did something wrong in carrying the pregnancy. Most miscarriages are beyond your control and occur because the fetus stops growing.

Types of miscarriage

Your pregnancy care provider may diagnose you with the following types of miscarriage:

  • Missed miscarriage: You’ve lost the pregnancy but are unaware it’s happened. There are no symptoms of miscarriage, but an ultrasound confirms the fetus has no heartbeat.
  • Complete miscarriage: You’ve lost the pregnancy and your uterus is empty. You’ve experienced bleeding and passed fetal tissue. Your provider can confirm a complete miscarriage with an ultrasound.
  • Recurrent miscarriage: Three consecutive miscarriages. It affects about 1% of couples.
  • Threatened miscarriage: Your cervix stays closed, but you’re bleeding and experiencing pelvic cramping. The pregnancy typically continues with no further issues. Your pregnancy care provider may monitor you more closely for the rest of your pregnancy.
  • Inevitable miscarriage: You’re bleeding, cramping and your cervix has started to open (dilate). You may leak amniotic fluid. A complete miscarriage is likely.

Procedure

If you experience the loss of a pregnancy, the fetus must be removed from your uterus. If any parts of the pregnancy are left inside your body, you could experience infection, bleeding or other complications.

If the miscarriage is complete and your uterus expels all the fetal tissue, then no further treatment is usually needed. Your pregnancy care provider will conduct an ultrasound to make sure there’s nothing left in your uterus.

If your body doesn’t remove all the tissue on its own or you haven’t started to bleed, your pregnancy care provider will recommend removing the tissue with medication or surgery.

How can One prevent another miscarriage?

It’s usually not possible to prevent a miscarriage. If you have a miscarriage, it’s not because you did something to cause it. Taking care of your body is the best thing you can do. Some examples of ways to care for yourself include:

  • Attending all your prenatal care appointments.
  • Maintaining a weight that’s healthy for you.
  • Avoiding risk factors for miscarriage like drinking alcohol and smoking cigarettes.
  • Taking a prenatal vitamin.
  • Getting regular exercise and eating a healthy diet.

FAQ’s

The procedure is not painful as it is done under light sedation, but may cause mild discomfort. At our clinic, we use mild anesthesia administered through an IV route which relieves discomfort.

IVF is likely to be recommended for the following fertility problems:
1. If you have blocked or damaged fallopian tubes
2. If your partner has male infertility issues like Oligozoospermia, Teratozoospermia or Athenozoospermia.
3. If you have premature ovarian failure
4. If you have been trying to conceive for at least two years and a cause hasn’t been found to explain why you have not become pregnant.

1. Women with a tubal problem
2. Women with unexplained fertility
3. Women with severe endometriosis
4. Couples with male factor infertility

Before treatment start, you will discussmedical history and the treatment processincluding risk and side effects kith your doctor.
1. Stimulation- After your baseline scans, injections will stimulate your ovaries to develop multiple eggs
2. Monitoring- Regular scans and blood test allow us to monitor your ovanan response to the drug
3. Trigger injections- When hormones are at the right levels another injection will trigger the eggs to mature
4. Egg collection and sperm collection- Eggs are collected via a needle passed through the vagina whilst you are under sedation. A semen sample is required on the day of egg collection
5. Fertilization and embryo development- Eggs and sperm are placed P an incubator to fertilize. Embryo development is monitored by CRGH embryologist
6. Embryo transfer- The best ennbryo(s) 6 /are transferred back into the uterus. Any suitable embryo not transferred can be frozen for Later use
7. Pregnancy test- Patient takes a pregnancy test 16 days after embryo transfer. At this stage we will arrange appropriate support.

So the point is that the IVF success rate could vary based on the denominator used to calculate the IVF cycle outcome. Its always preferable to always define the success rate using all the available denominators and discuss every one of them with the couple. The couple should be able to understand the sucess chances for their particular condition. There are even more denominators like age, number of embryos transfered, frozen or fresh emebto transfer, ICSI, PGD / PGS tested embryos etc. This further gets complicated when each ivf clinic or ivf doctor in the center wants to boos their success rates to showcase themselves in this highly competitive era.

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